Program

SAGEEP 2014 PROGRAM

Prospective attendees are urged to review the activity and event descriptions prior to registering for SAGEEP 2014. 

View the Schedule at a Glance for technical session titles and all conference activities. 

View the entire  Technical Program by session,  title (oral and poster), day, time, author and location. 
View the entire Conference Program  (printable document)
View important registration information (and printable onsite registration forms) on the Registration Information page. 

Program Change:  SC2, Environmental Applications of of the Induced Polarization Method, will begin at 8:30 a.m. and end at 5:00 p.m.

NEW ADDITION TO THE PROGRAM:  EEGS/SEG MERGER FORUM MONDAY, MARCH 17

EEGS leadership has arranged for a special opportunity to provide an update on and answer questions about current talks between EEGS and the SEG concerning a potential merger.  The EEGS Board and Task Force members who are negotiating with the SEG are committed to offering as many communication avenues as possible; therefore, an EEGS/SEG Merger Forum is scheduled for the lunch break on Monday, March 17 in Arlington (session room) from 12:45 to 1:30 p.m.

EEGS members are invited to attend (everyone is welcome) this important Forum to get the latest developments and answers to your questions.  Merging with the SEG entails the dissolution of EEGS as a corporate entity and the formation of a new, wholly owned, NS-focused subsidiary of the SEG.  At the completion of the negotiations, a vote of the EEGS and the SEG’s Near Surface Section memberships will be required- it’s important for EEGS members to understand the process and implications.  Join fellow EEGS members and leadership to find out more about:

  • the status of the Agreement between EEGS and the SEG to merge EEGS and SEG’s Near Surface Section memberships and affirm SEG’s formation of a new, near surface focused wholly owned subsidiary.  
  • a  timeline of a potential merger.
  • a potential EEGS Membership vote and what it means to you.

 

FULL DAY FIELD TRIP SUNDAY, MARCH 16

Cape Ann Field Trip

If you’re visiting the Boston area, this is a tailor-made excursion for those who would like to get a taste of the Boston and surrounding area flavor.  The ¾ day outing, beginning at 8:30 a.m. will return in plenty of time to attend the Ice Breaker, SAGEEP’s opening event.  The day begins with a drive up Boston’s North Shore to Rockport, and includes a visit to the granite quarry at Halibut Point State Park.  Lunch is on your own at the Cape Ann Brewing Company by the harbor in Gloucester (award winning specialty craft beers on draft and brewed on premise!) with a tour of the brewery conducted by the brewmaster!  On the return trip, a stop at the Ryan and Wood Distillery rounds out the day.   Minimum participation required – register by March 3.


AWARDS & KEYNOTE ADDRESS MONDAY, MARCH 17, 2014 - NOTE:  ROOM CHANGE:  NOW IN SALON F

SAGEEP 2014 KEYNOTE SPEAKER, ALFRED WILLIAM EUSTES III, PHD, ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR IN PETROLEUM ENGINEERING, COLORADO SCHOOL OF MINES
Are we alone in the Universe?  To find that answer will require the use of technology and techniques we use for subsurface exploration.  There is one place accessible to mankind that has the strongest possibility to answer that question:  Mars.  The various Mars missions to date have indicated that there are no organic materials on the surface of the planet; however, as on Earth, there could be a large biomass under the surface.  The tools and techniques developed for Earth subsurface exploration and drilling are the basis for this extraterrestrial subsurface access technology.  And what we learn building and deploying this technology will help us understand how to better explore and drill here on Earth."  There will also be some discussion about the INSIGHT (Interior exploration using Seismic Investigations, Geodesy and Heat Transport) mission, a NASA Discovery Program mission scheduled for 2016 that will place a single geophysical lander on Mars to study its deep interior.

Alfred Eustes, a Colorado School of Mines petroleum engineering professor, has thirty-five years of oilfield experience including nine years with ARCO.  He has BS and MS degrees in mechanical engineering and a Petroleum Engineering doctorate from the Colorado School of Mines.  He has advised the NSF with Antarctica ice coring and NASA regarding extraterrestrial drilling and is working with industry on unconventional resources and NREL on geothermal drilling.

 

OUTDOOR DEMONSTRATIONS MONDAY, MARCH 17

Participants who choose to attend the exhibitors equipment demonstrations will be rewarded by viewing the latest equipment exhibitors are offering at the location of one of the most treasured sites in Boston - the historic Trinity Church.  It is the only church in the United States and the only building in Boston that has been honored as one of the "Ten Most Significant Buildings in the United States" by the American Institute of Architects (AIA).  A short walk from the host hotel, the Boston Marriott Copley Place hotel, the demonstrations will take place on the grounds in front of the Trinity Church (206 Clarendon St. , Copley Square). 

 Upon your return, enjoy hot chocolate being served in the Exhibition Hall.  There is no charge to SAGEEP attendees; however, all participants must wear their badges.


STUDENT EVENT MONDAY, MARCH 17

The Student Event is open to all registrants and guests.  Begin by meeting at 6:00 p.m. at the SAGEEP 2014 registration area.  Participants will walk, via the indoor walkway, through the Copley Bridge/Prudential Center to Kings, just outside the shopping complex exit.  At Kings Boston there will be pizza, hot hors d'oeuvre selections (beverages on own at bar) and bowling (shoe rental included) for all.   Self-described as “upscale, retro-inspired décor and executive-chef designed menus," Kings offers 24,000 sq. feet of bowling, three bars, billiards, skee ball and a shuffleboard table (regulation!).  SAGEEP conference badges required and students must wear their student ribbons.  No charge for students.

 

LUNCHEON WITH SPEAKER TUESDAY, MARCH 18, 2014
"FROM EARTHQUAKE SOURCES TO SITE RESPONSE: THE SEISMIC HAZARD OF BOSTON"?
JOHN EBEL, PROFESSOR IN THE DEPARTMENT OF EARTH AND ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES/DIRECTOR OF THE WESTON OBSERVATORY, BOSTON COLLEGE

Boston has been affected by several notable earthquakes during historic times, and modern analyses suggest that it lies in an area of moderate seismic hazard. The large areas of soft surface soils and landfill in Boston and vicinity compound the seismic hazard because these areas may be prone to ground shaking amplification and even ground liquefaction in strong earthquake shaking. This talk will summarize the artificial filling and earthquake history of Boston and vicinity, discuss the soil amplification and liquefaction potential in the area, and assess what damage might occur in Boston if a strong earthquake takes place somewhere near the city.

Dr. John E. Ebel is a Professor of Geophysics at Boston College and is a Senior Research Scientist at the Weston Observatory of Boston College.  For over 30 years he has monitored earthquakes and studied the earthquake activity of northeastern North America, and in particular in New England.  His research expertise includes earthquake sources, seismic wave propagation, seismic hazard analysis, and probabilistic earthquake forecasting.  In addition to northeastern North America, he has studied earthquake activity in California, Germany, South America, and the southwest Pacific, among other places.  One of his research interests has been reevaluating the historic earthquakes of northeastern North America.  He has published over 60 technical papers and one book. 

 

CONFERENCE EVENING EVENT TUESDAY, MARCH 18

Attendees are invited to join colleagues for this special conference evening event for dinner, including wine.  No transportation arrangements necessary: the event is being hosted in the hotel (Salon G).

EEGS ANNUAL MEETING & LUNCHEON WEDNESDAY, MARCH 19

"GPR PROFILES OF GYTTJA, GLACIOFLUVIAL SEDIMENTATION AND TILL"
STEVEN ARCONE, RESEARCH GEOPHYSICIST
Mirror Lake in Woodstock, New Hampshire, lies within the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest, a long-term ecologic and hydrologic research (LTER) site since 1950.   The accumulation of lacustrine sediments has been of interest because they were expected to indicate rates of erosion and vegetative evolution since glacial recession, and the disposition of subottom till and bedrock because of their potential to act as subbottom hydraulic pathways.  The extremely low conductivity of the lake water and sediments made GPR an effective investigation method.

The GPR profiles delineate saturated organic-rich mud, glaciofluvial sediments, till, and mainly near-shore bedrock.  Structurally, the lake sedimentation is divided by a large glaciofluvial delta extending half way across the lake and originating from the present stream on the west side.  In contrast to earlier studies that assumed bedrock fractures as the main hydraulic pathways beneath the lake, I interpret up to at least 26 m of till beneath as much as 6 m of glaciofluvial outwash.  Profiles recorded in January of 2013 using higher power and lower frequency antennas failed to obtain deeper bedrock returns, but improved delineation of the delta extent.

Steve Arcone's programs focus on radiowave scattering and dispersion, surface wave propagation in rough terrain, glacial and periglacial stratigraphy, and the dielectric properties of sediments.  His field research has been mainly in Alaska, Antarctica, and New Hampshire, with support from NSF, NASA, SERDP and the Army 6.1 program.  

Also featured at the luncheon will be EEGS’ Annual Meeting.  Leadership will report on the state of EEGS and recognize our important sponsors and SAGEEP organizers.